A Fantasy Maps Update

It’s been a while since my last post. That’s because I spent most of last week with my head down, working on a presentation about fantasy maps for a science fiction/fantasy convention that took place over the weekend. The presentation was called “The Territory Is Not the Map: Exploring the Fantasy Map Style,” and it … Continue reading “A Fantasy Maps Update”

New at Tor.com: ‘Where Do Fantasy Maps Come From?’

New from me at Tor.com this morning, the latest instalment in my series on the history and design of fantasy maps. “Where Do Fantasy Maps Come From?” looks at the influences on and origins of the fantasy map style—the existing traditions, stretching back as far back as the sixteenth century, that the fantasy map drew … Continue reading “New at Tor.com: ‘Where Do Fantasy Maps Come From?’”

Fantasy Maps Don’t Belong in the Hands of Fantasy Characters

My latest piece for Tor.com went live this morning. It’s called “Fantasy Maps Don’t Belong in the Hands of Fantasy Characters” and it deals with the question of in-world fantasy maps: the maps that characters inside a fantasy novel might use. (Hint: They wouldn’t look like the maps found on the endpapers of a fantasy … Continue reading “Fantasy Maps Don’t Belong in the Hands of Fantasy Characters”

An Online Class on Fantasy Maps

Alex Acks and Paul Weimer are teaching an online class on creating fantasy maps: Join Alex Acks and Paul Weimer as they talk about fantasy maps in order to give you the tools you need to create and map your world. Topics include basic geologic principles, common mistakes, forms maps can take, how maps reflect … Continue reading “An Online Class on Fantasy Maps”

Russell Kirkpatrick on Fantasy Maps

You don’t have to draw a pointy-witch’s-hat faux-medieval map. You can draw an oblique perspective. You can fill your map with misdirection. You can scrawl annotations over it and make it an actual artifact of your story. You can make geological maps, three-dimensional cutaways, cartoons, whatever suits your story. In fact, I await the day … Continue reading “Russell Kirkpatrick on Fantasy Maps”

In Defence of Fantasy Maps

Paul Weimer offers up a defence of fantasy maps, at least the good ones. It might be facile to hashtag #notallmaps, but, really, not every map is a geologic mess, not every map is a Eurocentric western ocean oriented map, with an eastern blend into problematic oriental racial types. Not every map has borders which … Continue reading “In Defence of Fantasy Maps”

Fantasy Maps Exhibit at Texas A&M Library

An exhibition of fantasy maps, Worlds Imagined: The Maps of Imaginary Places Collection, opens Friday at Texas A&M University’s Cushing Memorial Library and Archives. “The maps included are part of an ongoing effort by [Texas A&M’s] Maps and GIS [Library] and the Science Fiction & Fantasy Research Collection to develop a shared collection of maps of imaginary … Continue reading “Fantasy Maps Exhibit at Texas A&M Library”

The British Library on Fantasy Maps

British Library curator Tom Harper writes about fantasy maps, which make up a major component of the Library’s current exhibition, Maps and the 20th Century: Drawing the Line (previously). Fantasy maps increased in number during the 20th century due to the rise of science fiction and fantasy writing, and the birth of television and video games. … Continue reading “The British Library on Fantasy Maps”

Parnasium’s Fantasy Maps of Real-World Places

I’ve written before about maps of the real world done in the style of fantasy maps; they’re a key piece of evidence for my argument that fantasy maps have a distinct (and limited) style. Enough of these fantasy maps of reality are being done that it’s clearly a thing now. The latest examples I’ve encountered come from an … Continue reading “Parnasium’s Fantasy Maps of Real-World Places”

Fantasy Maps: Macaroni and Malazan

This post describing how to make a fantasy map using macaroni has been making the rounds of Tumblr for a while—it was first posted in January 2014—but it just got picked up by Tor.com recently, so let’s talk about it. The point of the post is how quick and easy it is to make a good … Continue reading “Fantasy Maps: Macaroni and Malazan”

The Library of Congress Blog’s Last Post on Fantasy Maps

The Library of Congress blog’s series on maps of imaginary places has now concluded; the final post is a look at what’s available on the subject from the Library of Congress itself. One interesting nugget of information: “The Library of Congress classification system has a range of call numbers reserved for maps of imaginary places: G9930-G9979.” How about … Continue reading “The Library of Congress Blog’s Last Post on Fantasy Maps”

Two More Posts on Fantasy Maps

Two more posts about imaginary maps on the Library of Congress’s map blog: a look at maps made after the books were published (such as posters, movie adaptations and online maps), focusing on Middle-earth and Westeros; and a look at maps in children’s stories that talks about whether what appears on maps is in fact true. (In my previous … Continue reading “Two More Posts on Fantasy Maps”