India Proposes Fines, Jail Terms for ‘Incorrect’ Maps

The government of India has long been obsessed with maps that failed to show its official and “correct” borders—i.e., maps that showed the Pakistan-controlled parts of Jammu and Kashmir as part of Pakistan, or Chinese-controlled Aksai Chin and Chinese-claimed Arunachal Pradesh as part of China. Maps for an international audience that showed the de facto situation on the ground rather than the Indian claim have been censored at the border. Now things have escalated: a draft bill proposes drastic penalties: up to seven years in prison and a fine of up to Rs 100 crore (about $15 million U.S.; 1 crore = 10 million) for publishing a map or geospatial data with the “wrong” boundaries. News coverage: Hindustani TimesQuartz IndiaWashington Post. [Stefan Geens/WMS]

Previously: India Censors The Economist’s Kashmir MapIndia’s Mapping Panic ContinuesThe Survey of India Isn’t HelpingIndia Stamps Publications’ “Incorrect” Maps at the BorderMaps Must Be Cleared by the Survey of IndiaGoogle Earth, India and Security—AgainGoogle Earth: Indian Reactions.

Author: Jonathan Crowe

I blog about maps at The Map Room, review books for AE: The Canadian Science Fiction Review, and edit a fanzine called Ecdysis.