Mapping Online Gun Sales

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NPR

As part of an article looking at semi-automatic weapons being sold online, NPR produced the above map, which shows the locations of classified listings on Armslist (a website described as “the Craigslist of guns”) between 12 and 15 June 2016 (i.e., immediately after the Orlando nightclub shooting). About 90 percent of Armslist listings had location data; about one in four of these listings are for semi-automatic weapons. [Maps on the Web]

Previously: In the U.S., Toddlers Shoot People Often Enough That It Can Be Mapped.

Mapping the EU Referendum Results

Maps of the results of the United Kingdom’s referendum on remaining in the European Union show several different ways of presenting the results.

The BBC’s election night map is bare-bones, showing which side won which local authority, but not by how much. Appropriate for the moment, and for finding your locality, but not necessarily very revealing.

brexit-nyt
The New York Times

The New York Times’s map, another example of the fine work done by their graphics department, is a choropleth map that indicates the margin of victory in each local authority. It shows the intensity of the win by each side. (The Times does something similar with a hexagon grid map.)

brexit-guardian
The Guardian

But the EU referendum isn’t like a general election, where each electoral district has roughly the same population, and counts the the same in parliament. In this case it’s the raw vote numbers that count, and local districts can vary in size by as much as a couple of orders of magnitude. So the Guardian’s approach (at right), a hexagon grid that combines a choropleth map with a cartogram to show both the margin of victory and the size of the electorate, is probably most fit for purpose in this case.

I’m actively looking for other maps of the EU referendum results. Send me links, and I’ll update this post below.

Mayfly Hatch Shows Up on Radar

When mayflies “hatch”—that is to say, moult into their final, adult “imago” form—they emerge in truly enormous numbers. Numerous enough to turn up on the National Weather Service’s radar earlier this month. [CBC News]

A Preview of Maps in iOS 10

iLounge’s Jesse Hollington looks at the changes coming to Maps in iOS 10, the next release of Apple’s operating system for the iPhone and iPad. “Functionally, it doesn’t quite incorporate the kind of sweeping changes we’ve seen in prior years, but instead focuses on redesigning the user experience and adding a few useful iterative features.” (Thanks to James Fee for the link.)

The Origins of North at the Top of Maps

BBC Future’s Caroline Williams explores the following question: why do modern maps have north at the top? “Given such a long history of human map-making, it is perhaps surprising that it is only within the last few hundred years that north has been consistently considered to be at the top.” Early European maps had east at the top (orientation is derived from orient, or east); Islamic maps faced south. When maps changed to north-at-top is difficult to pinpoint, or at least the article has difficulty in doing so, but it came relatively late in history. (Thanks to Denis Dooley for the link.)

A Fantasy Map of North America

aoraki-fantasy-north-america

The latest map of the real world done in the style of fantasy maps (remember: fantasy maps have a distinct style), at least that I’ve encountered, is this map of North America offered by Etsy seller Aoraki Maps. (They also have one of the southeastern U.S.) The style is very fantasy map, with cursive labels rather than the (older) Didone-style lettering. [Boing Boing]

Previously: Fantasy Maps of U.S. CitiesA Fantasy Map of IrelandA Fantasy Map of Great BritainA Fantasy Map of AustraliaA Fantasy Map of the U.S.

With Here Maps About to Go Away, Microsoft Updates Its Windows 10 Maps App

After Here Maps was sold to a consortium of German automakers, it announced that it was dropping support for Here Maps on Windows Phone and Windows 10 Mobile, with the workaround that kept those map apps going expiring at the end of this month. Yesterday Microsoft announced a major update to its native Windows 10 Maps app; among its new features is a tool to import favourites from the obsolescent Here apps. [Engadget]

Hillary Clinton in the Primaries: 2008 vs. 2016

sabato-clinton

Geoffrey Skelley compares the percentage of the Democratic primary vote won by Hillary Clinton in 2008 with the percentage she won in 2016: among other things, she was up sharply in the Deep South and down sharply in the industrial Midwest and Appalachia. “While the universe of voters participating in 2008 and then 2016 changed considerably thanks to mobility, interest, and mortality, our map suggests that many ’08 Clinton voters became ’16 Sanders voters, and many ’08 Obama voters became ’16 Clinton voters.” [Daily Kos]

Fantasy Maps: Middle-earth vs. Westeros

In the latest instalment of Tim St. Onge’s series of posts on fantasy maps at the Library of Congress’s map blog (see previous entry), he takes as a starting point my argument that Tolkien’s map of Middle-earth is the progenitor map from which the modern fantasy map design is descended, and compares that map to maps of Westeros from George R. R. Martin’s Song of Ice and Fire series.

Previously: The Library of Congress Looks at Fantasy Maps; Review: The Lands of Ice and Fire.

The Princeton Braillists

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Princeton Braillists’ map of Alaska: master master tooled in metal foil (left); thermoform copy made from metal master (right).

The Princeton Braillists publish tactile maps and atlases for a blind readership. Several books of maps are available: world and regional atlasesmaps of U.S. states, and others.

Maps and drawings are created by hand in an aluminum foil sheet. The metal is embossed with a variety of tools to produce raised lines and areas of varying height, texture and width. The maps are labelled with key letters that are identified on the pages preceding each map. The master drawing is duplicated by the Thermoform process to make clear, sharp copies. The 11×11½-inch plastic sheets are bound into volumes with cardboard covers and spiral plastic binders.

[cartogeek]

Unique Perspectives: Japanese Map Exhibition in Chicago

artic-japanese Opening this Saturday, 25 June at the Art Institute of Chicago and running until 6 November, Unique Perspectives: Japanese Maps from the 18th and 19th Centuries “showcases the beauty of Japanese printmaking. The 18th- and 19th-century maps on view feature the world, the Japanese archipelago, and the country’s major cities, including Osaka, Yokohama, Edo, Nagasaki, and Kyoto. Highlights include works from trustee Barry MacLean’s comprehensive collection.” [WMS]

Fast Company Profiles Ed Parsons

Fast Company profiles Google’s geospatial technologist Ed Parsons, whose name should be familiar to longtime Map Room readers. (I first encountered his work when he was still at the Ordnance Survey; he joined Google in 2007.) In some way the profile uses Ed to understand Google’s mapping ambitions, which Ed discusses at length. Understanding the corporate via the personal, as it were. (Parsons was also the subject of a similar profile in The Independent in 2014.) [Owen Boswarva]